Monthly Archives: May 2011

Improving Usability with Fitts’ Law

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Back in 1954, psychologist Paul Fitts published an article the detailed his theory on human mechanics as it pertained to aimed movement. It was Fitts’ observation that the action of pointing to or tapping an target object could be measured and predicted mathematically.

Fitts stated that the size of the target object along with its distance from the starting location could be directly measured, allowing him to model the ease at which a person could perform the same action with a different target object.

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Critical Thinking as a Powerful Learning Tool

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Web designers are constantly learning and evolving. The web design community, relative to other professional communities, is young and hungry to learn. These are — more often than not — great characteristics of an industry that strives to progress and innovate.

However, being young and being hungry for knowledge also fuels unfair snap judgments about the value of the work and learning material being put out there. So often, I see a new blog post or news story that results in a polarized debate instead of an informative conversation that can push an idea forward.

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The “Bad Client” Fallacy

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Web design and development blogs are always full of advice and constructive discussions. The mission of these blogs is to help the community stay informed.

One such informative article that a fellow Six Revisions writer of mine wrote recently is about the strategies involved in avoiding bad clients. Many other Six Revisions writers have tackled this concept with articles that discuss how to avoid project disasters, how to handle difficult client situations, and things we shouldn’t tolerate in design projects, all circling back to the notion that it’s just best to avoid “bad” clients.

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